Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 102 Cultural Anthropology
(3 Credits, Fall/Spring)

The goal of this class is to equip students with the ability to approach human systems and patterns from a holistic perspective. Students will examine the behavioral adaptations humans have innovated in a variety of environments worldwide and a take a comparative perspective based on cultural relativism and human behavioral ecology. Universal themes including subsistence patterns, economic systems, political organization, gender roles, technology, artistic expression, and belief systems will also be emphasized. (This CWI course meets Idaho State Board of Education GEM competency requirements for GEM 6 - Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing OR the CWI Global Perspectives requirement. [It will not fulfill both requirements.]). (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology
(3 Credits, Fall/Spring)

Archaeology is the study of human, biological, and material remains for the purpose of reconstructing past cultures and societies. Learn how scientific methods can be used to discover secrets of the human past, what ideas and theories have developed from archaeological discoveries, and how data is obtained and used to develop explanations of our shared past. Students will be introduced to the history of archaeology; the nature of the archaeological record; the techniques used to reconstruct the physical, biological, and behavioral adaptations of ancient humans; and the current scientific theories about human history. (This CWI course meets Idaho State Board of Education GEM competency requirements for GEM 4 - Scientific Ways of Knowing.). (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 104 Biological Anthropology
(3 Credits, Fall/Spring/Summer)

Introduction to human evolution through the study of variation, genetics, adaptation, living primates, the fossil record, and the relationship between environment, biology, and behavior. (This CWI course meets Idaho State Board of Education GEM competency requirements for GEM 4 - Scientific Ways of Knowing.). (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 199 Anthropology Special Topics
(1-5 Credits, Varies)

This course is designed to permit the offering of special topics appropriate to a student's program. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. The course may be repeated as new topics are presented. (1 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 1 credits)

ANTH 220 Indigenous Peoples of North America
(3 Credits, Spring)

Examination of the wide variety of Indigenous cultures that existed in the United States and Canada immediately prior to European contact. Each culture will be covered as a complete and distinct whole. The class will focus on the ways in which the natural environment underscores cultural adaptations such as economic and subsistence systems, political organization, kinship and descent, family and household, gender roles, religion and the supernatural, and artistic expression. Indigenous ways of life at present, including socio-economic problems, are discussed throughout. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is recommended prior to enrollment. (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 240 Basque Heritage and Contemporary People
(3 Credits, Fall)

The Treasure Valley has the densest concentration of Basques outside of their ancestral homeland on the border of Spain and France. This course will explore the history and culture of the Basque Country, the forces that lead to Basque immigration to Idaho, and the notable contributions Basque Americans have made to preserve their language, music and dance, beliefs and rituals, and culinary heritage. A cross-comparison between contemporary Basques in the diaspora and the Basque Country will also be covered. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is recommended prior to enrollment. (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 250 Indigenous Mythology and Rituals
(3 Credits, Fall)

This course examines the diversity of belief systems from a behavioral ecology perspective. A comparative, holistic approach will be used to examine the beginnings of symbolic behavior among our human ancestors then transition into the present, focusing on a variety of indigenous cultures. Each society will be covered as a distinct whole with particular emphasis on the mythologies and rituals that evolve as a response to ecological conditions and subsistence patterns. The course will focus on the ways in which the natural environment underscores the creation and enculturation of the supernatural and associated rituals through oral tradition, ancestor worship, animism, rites of passage, totemism, artistic expression, sacred food, shamanism, and sorcery. This course will demonstrate the continuum between ecology, mythology, and ritual with broader anthropological themes that include: economic systems, political organization, kinship and descent, gender roles, and globalization. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is recommended prior to enrollment. (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 260 Mexican Heritage and Contemporary Peoples
(3 Credits, Fall)

This course will be divided into three distinct, yet related, segments. The first will provide an overview of the four major state-level pre-contact societies; those of the Olmec, Teotihuacano, Mayan, and Aztec peoples. The second will transition into an examination of the indigenous strongholds in current Mexico including the Mayan, Zapotec, Tarahumara, Huichol, and Nahua peoples and their adaptive strategies to maintain and revitalize their cultural traditions and language in an age of globalization. The course will also look at the mestizo identity most Mexicans claim and the Mexican-American realities of remittance economies, dual identities, and separated kin groups. The final segment of the course will focus on contemporary issues in Mexico relating to poverty, immigration, drug trafficking, political corruption, shifting religious attitudes, fluctuating subsistence patterns, and increasing ecological degradation. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is recommended prior to enrollment. (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 290 Anthropology Capstone
(3 Credits, Spring)

The capstone course will be the culminating experience in completing the Anthropology AA degree. This 3-credit course will be comprised of two major areas of focus. Firstly, students will organize, edit, and improve the Signature Assignments contained in their e-Portfolios with particular attention given to research papers produced in ANTH courses. Secondly, students will engage in an ethnographic inquiry that will require three formal interviews with key consultants in their field of study relating to a problem or question they will determine with the professor's assistance. PREREQ: Completion of at least one 200-level Anthropology (ANTH) course. (3 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 3 credits)

ANTH 293 Anthropology Internship
(1-3 Credits, Varies)

Internships allow students to apply learning to real-life career possibilities. Credits are earned through supervised fieldwork specifically related to a student's area of study. An Internship Registration Form must be completed and turned into a One Stop Student Services location before a student may register for an internship course. (Pass/No Pass) PREREQ: Permission of department's internship coordinator and submission of a completed Internship Registration Form. (0 lecture hours, 3 lab hours, 1 credits)

ANTH 296 Anthropology Independent Study
(1-10 Credits, Varies)

This is a term long project. Each credit hour is equivalent to 45 hours of work on a project. Students should make arrangements with the instructor in their field of interest. Before enrolling for independent study, a student must obtain approval of the department chair and dean, acting on the recommendation of the instructor who will be supervising the independent study. An Independent Study Registration Form must be completed and turned into a One Stop Student Services location before a student may register for this course. PREREQ: PERM/INST and submission of a completed Independent Study Registration Form. (0 lecture hours, 0 lab hours, 1 credits)

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